Chinese Medicine

Chinese medicine acts as a timeless bridge that can initiate and support change and growth in any and every life dimension: physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual. Its insightful wisdom and ability to understand and address individual health needs empowers each person with a way to unite body, mind, and spirit—the foundation for lasting, authentic health.

Chinese medicine teaches us how to live a life of balance, wellness, and harmony. The four key principles of this philosophy can be defined as:

  1. Your body is an integrated whole. Each and every structure in your body is an integral and necessary part of the whole. Along with your mind, emotions, and spirit, your physical body structures form a miraculously complex, interrelated system that is powered by life force, or energy.
  2. You are completely connected to nature. Changes in nature are always reflected in your body. Chinese medicine factors in the particular season, geographical location, time of day, as well as your age, genetics, and the condition of your body when looking at your health issues.
  3. You were born with a natural self-healing ability. Your body is a microcosm that reflects the macrocosm. Think about it: nature has a regenerative capacity, and so do you. Sometimes, this ability may appear to be lost or difficult to access. In most cases, it is never completely gone.
  4. Prevention is the best cure. Do you know your body is continually revealing signs about the state of your health? Let’s face it, it’s common to ignore these signs or symptoms until something more complicated arises. Chinese medicine teaches you how to interpret what your body is telling you.

Acupunctures Role in Eastern Medicine

Acupuncture (and acupressure) is a branch of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Eastern medicine that has been practised in China and the far east for thousands of years. It has been developed, tested, researched and refined to give a detailed understanding of the body’s energetic balance. Without the benefit of modern scientific equipment, the first acupuncturists discovered many now familiar aspects of biomedical science, such as the impact of emotional stress on the body. Traditional acupuncture has steadily grown in popularity in the UK since the 1970s.

 

It has a very positive model of good health and function, and looks at pain and illness as signs that the body is out of balance. The overall aim of acupuncture treatment, then, is to restore the body’s equilibrium.

What makes this system so uniquely suited to modern life is that physical, emotional and mental are seen as interdependent, and reflect what many people perceive as the connection between the different aspects their lives.

The focus is on the individual, not their illness, and all the symptoms are seen in relation to each other. Each patient is unique; two people with the same western diagnosis may well receive different acupuncture treatments.

Traditional acupuncturists believe that the underlying principle of treatment is that illness and pain occur when the body’s Qi, or vital energy, cannot flow freely. There can be many reasons for this; emotional and physical stress, poor nutrition, infection or injury are among the most common. By inserting ultra-fine sterile needles into specific acupuncture points, a traditional acupuncturist seeks to re-establish the free flow of Qi to restore balance and trigger the body’s natural healing response.